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Tag: Endometriosis

Inside the Mind of a Sick Person

Inside the Mind of a Sick Person

“What do sick people think about? How do you know when you start to be a sick person?” This statement by author Nina Riggs in her memoir, The Bright Hour, was spoken when she woke up one morning shortly after she was diagnosed with breast cancer. When I read it, it gave me pause. I tried to remember if I had ever had a similar thought and couldn’t locate one anywhere in my memory, although that’s not saying much nowadays….

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Coping with POTS

Coping with POTS

I was recently provided with a very well-written article about POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome) by a fellow POTSie who sees the same specialist I do. The article was written by the specialist, his nurse, and some of his patients who are in the healthcare field. Please feel free to share the article with friends and family members! 😊 While I enjoyed all aspects of the article, the part that surprised me the most, mainly due to the fact that…

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A POTSie Life For Me

A POTSie Life For Me

Yesterday was a very overwhelming day, but I’m going to try my best to make it somewhat comprehensible. After six months of waiting (seriously, I scheduled this appointment in January), I finally had my appointment with Dr. Wilson. He’s a neurologist who specializes in POTS and has patients come from all over the country to see him. And now it was finally my turn!

Are You Like Me?

Are You Like Me?

I think I need to take a break from reading memoirs. But I can’t seem to stop. My last four books: Still Waiting by Ann Swindell. Faithfully encouraging and integrates the story of the Bleeding Woman (one of my favorite parts of the Gospels). “From my own perspective, I couldn’t see any reason why God wouldn’t heal me, why He wouldn’t change my struggle into a victorious cure. Wouldn’t He get all the glory? All the doctors and therapies and supplements…

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Friends, Can You Help Me?

Friends, Can You Help Me?

I’ll try to keep this short and sweet so as to not burden anyone. I need help from you, my faithful readers. The brain fog caused by one of my medical conditions, POTS, a form of dysautonomia, has made it monumentally difficult for me to think. It’s like…my thoughts won’t connect, or certain parts of my brain won’t talk to each other. I can almost feel this void in the middle of my head, like a bridge is out over…

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The Last Shift

The Last Shift

If you’ve been following my blog since before October 2016 or so, you might remember that I attempted to return to work on October 24th, six weeks after my brain surgery. You may also remember that it was a complete disaster and I have been unable to work since. But since that was a one-off failure, I don’t count that day as my last day of work. The day that gets that designation in my book is June 10th. That’s…

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Is My Illness My Fault?

Is My Illness My Fault?

For me, 2016 was the year of the surgeries and bizarre diagnoses. Three surgeries, to be exact, spanning over a period of four months. Once the surgeries were over, I thought that once I had an adequate recovery period, I would be back to normal. I’d be able to return to work, from which I’d had to take an extended leave of absence, and I could put the entire year behind me as a gargantuan fluke. But it was not…

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Fighting Back With Love

Fighting Back With Love

Recently, I wrote a post that ended up being quite popular within the dysautonomia community. It’s actually been the most popular post I’ve written this year. I honestly have no idea why; I have read it over and over again and can’t seem to find what is so remarkable about it. When I asked my husband, even he said there was nothing profound about it. (Thanks, honey; I can always count on you to be honest. 😊) But whatever it…

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When Your Depression Is Invalidated

When Your Depression Is Invalidated

One of the worst feelings you can experience as a chronically ill person is invalidation. It’s not necessarily that others don’t believe you (although that is also a tremendous problem and a discussion for another time), but that they either don’t see or don’t understand how much your illness(es) impact your daily life. Especially when mental health plays a role in your battles. And what makes it even more frustrating? When that invalidation comes from healthcare professionals. When, to their…

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