Rebellion Gone Wrong

I’m not quite sure I’ve gone this long without updating my blog before, even after my multiple surgeries last year. This week has been a weird one, though, and I just haven’t felt like writing. Probably because of my rebellion that kind of ended up going sideways.

Hubby was out of town presenting at an emergency medicine conference in Orlando, so I’ve been alone with the cats all week. They’re used to me being home all the time, but not to him being gone. Surprisingly, I didn’t oversleep any of those days, except perhaps today.

But last week, I just suddenly got so sick of being sick. I wanted to pretend that I was normal. Or maybe I was trying to convince myself that I’m not as sick as I appear to be. So I rebelled.

Fitness GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

Turns out, stuff like that backfires.

Loki GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

Continue reading “Rebellion Gone Wrong”

Share Your World: May 8, 2017

This will be a weekly post of the most random of random questions to answer- to share my world! Thanks to Cee’s blog for being the brainchild behind this!

IMG_2077
Today’s fun pair of compression socks!

When you’re alone at home, do you wear shoes, socks, slippers, or go barefoot? Well, I always have a pair of socks on. Since I was diagnosed with POTS in January, I’ve worn compression socks every day. (It appears I have 17 pairs of fun-colored compression socks.) Not sure how the knee-high socks thing is going to work out during the summer, though. But in addition to socks, unless it’s the height of summer, I wear slippers because we have tile floors and wood floors that are extremely slippery (and cold!) in these socks. I’ve had complete wipeouts while turning a corner quickly (although that was really the cat’s fault…) Continue reading “Share Your World: May 8, 2017”

She Told Me I Was Beautiful

And now she’s dead.

Back up.

This post contains discussions of untimely death and suicide. Please stay safe and steer clear if these subjects may be triggering for you.

One of the interesting things about having chronic illness(es) is how your friendships change. In many unfortunate cases, people who were once your friends fade into the background. Sometimes it’s because they’re uncomfortable being around someone who is ill. Or maybe they don’t like the new version of this person they knew for so long. Or they could simply just not believe there’s anything wrong with this person because, like it or not, many chronic illnesses are invisible illnesses.

As a result of this, many individuals with chronic illness develop online friendships with others who are ill; people like themselves who understand exactly what they’re going through. Although not all of these friendships are with people who are ill. I have found new friends who are like-minded in faith and love of literature who I care for just as much.

But in the world of cyberspace, these friendships can result in heartache more often than you might think.

Continue reading “She Told Me I Was Beautiful”

Share Your World: May 1, 2017

This will be a weekly post of the most random of random questions to answer- to share my world! Thanks to Cee’s blog for being the brainchild behind this!

Would you rather live where it is always hot or always cold? Always cold. I love winter and snow. ❄️🌨 Although it’s kind of strange, because even though I have a cold intolerance (I’m freezing most of the time) because of my POTS, so you’d think I’d hate the cold, I feel quite sick when it’s hot outside. At least, I can gauge that much after having had a few days already this year the 80s and I felt really sick. I’m dreading summer for that reason.

img_1465
A 3 am light winter snow a few months ago.

Continue reading “Share Your World: May 1, 2017”

April Book Haul

All quoted blurbs are from Goodreads.

This month I only ordered two books from the Book of the Month club.

IMG_1180American War by Omar El Akkad (2017). I can’t  think of any better way to describes it than the Goodreads synopsis: “A second American Civil War, a devastating plague, and one family caught deep in the middle a story that asks what might happen if America were to turn its most devastating policies and deadly weapons upon itself.” Just frightening enough to make you wonder…

IMG_1181One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter by Scaachi Koul (2017). Again, the Goodreads synopsis: “Scaachi deploys her razor-sharp humour to share her fears, outrages and mortifying experiences as an outsider growing up in Canada. Where strict gender rules bind in both Western and Indian cultures, forcing her to confront questions about gender dynamics, racial tensions, ethnic stereotypes and her father’s creeping mortality–all as she tries to find her feet in the world.” Continue reading “April Book Haul”

Things We Lost in the Fire

“Things we lost to the flame
Things we’ll never see again
All that we’ve amassed
Sits before us, shattered into ash…”

Things We Lost in the Fire (Bastille)

 

IMG_1123As Esther Smith said in her excellent book, When Chronic Pain and Illness Take Everything Away, “Grief is the process by which we actively release all that we feel, question, and remember at the feet of God and the people He has placed in our lives.”

At the end of the second chapter, she poses some questions that have me wrestling with my thoughts, emotions, and feelings towards God. Questioning God isn’t a bad thing. In fact, He encourages us to come to Him with our questions, fears, or doubts. If you’ve ever read Psalms, you know this to be true!

As part of my grief process, I am going to share my answers to the questions, as you all are the people God has placed in my life. I assume the intention of that is to find help through grief from a different perspective than God’s. Continue reading “Things We Lost in the Fire”

Migraine Prevention from Axon Optics

I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company.

Disclosure: This is a sponsored post. I was not compensated monetarily, but received the glasses to review. The opinions are entirely my own.

I had my first migraine when I was 13 years old. Thankfully, through my teens and twenties, they weren’t all that frequent, with weather changes, light sensitivity (particularly sunlight and fluorescent light), and stress being my primary triggers.

But that all changed in 2016. Continue reading “Migraine Prevention from Axon Optics”